2012 National Drug Control Strategy for the USA

The USA has published their 2012 National Drug Control Strategy. The intro from President Obama includes:

Illicit drug use in America contributed to an estimated $193 billion in crime, health, and lost productivity costs in 2007, the year for which the most recent estimate is available. In today’s challenging economic environment, we cannot afford such a drain on our economy and public resources. While difficult budget decisions must be made at all levels of government, we must ensure continued support for policies and programs that reduce drug use and its enormous costs to American society.

Research has documented that substance use disorder treatment is a sound public investment. For example, a 2006 study found that every dollar spent on treatment yielded an average of seven dollars in costs savings. The majority of these savings came from reduced criminal justice system involvement and increased employment earnings. **Benefit-cost in the California treatment outcome project: Does substance abuse treatment‘pay or itself’? Health Services Research, 41(1), 192-213, 2006**

Other studies document substantial cost-offsets in the healthcare domain alone . Another 2006 study reported a net savings of $2,500 per person per year in Medicaid costs associated with treatment, and a State of Washington report found that treatment yielded a con- servatively estimated $252 per person per month in cost reductions associated with medical care and state and community psychiatric hospitalizations. **The effect of substance abuse treatment on medicaid expenditures among general assistance welfare clients in Washington State, The Milbank Quarterly, 84(3), 555-576, 2006 and Washington State supplemental security income (SSI) cost-offset pilot project: 2002 progress report.

In 2010, an estimated 23.1 million Americans (9.1%) aged 12 or older needed specialized treatment for a substance use disorder, but only 2.6 million (roughly 11.2% of them) received it. We need to stop wasting money and lives and costing our society much more over the long term.

In 2010, over seven million people in the United States were under the supervision of the criminal justice system: over two million incarcerated and the remaining five million on probation or parole.

Compounding the significant expenditures on corrections is the fact that far too many offenders return to drug use and reenter the criminal justice system. Among state prisoners with substance use disorders, 53% had at least three prior sentences to probation or incarceration, compared to 32% of other inmates.

Many offenders deal with a chronic substance use disorder—a disease for which too many are inadequately treated. These offenders need effective substance use disorder and mental health treatment while incarcerated and should continue with recovery support services that assist with employment, housing, medical care, and other support upon their reentry into the community.

Related: UK Drug Policy Commission Recommends Decriminalizing Drug UseDrug Treatment Funding Can More Than Pay For Itself With Reduced Crime CostsImproving Addiction Treatment with The University of Wisconsin – Madison