Drug Abuse Crisis Fueled by Unregulated Sober Homes

Unfortunately there are plenty of scam, abusive and useless drug rehab centers. And the ongoing heroin crisis is fueling the growth of these ineffective and harmful drug rehab centers.

The Heroin Crisis in Trump’s Backyard

Palm Beach County is dubbed “the recovery capital of America” because it’s home to so many drug treatment centers, and has been for at least three decades. But in recent years its reputation as a balmy locale to get well has been particularly hard hit because of the proliferation of corrupt “sober homes,” communal houses for addicts who arrive from around the country, lured by offers of free rent, airplane tickets and even gym memberships.

Unregulated, the operators, many of whom lack any professional training, either ignore the rampant drug use at their facilities or even supply their clients with heroin so they can funnel them to outpatient drug treatment centers in exchange for bribes, an illegal practice known as “body brokering.” The owners keep them for as long as their insurance lasts and then they kick them out, broke and still addicted. Local residents have taken to calling them “walkers,” a reference to the stumbling zombies in the TV show “The Walking Dead”: forlorn-looking kids wandering around in a daze, dragging suitcases or toting plastic bags, who often end up sleeping in the park.

One notorious sober home owner, Kenneth Chatman, who was sentenced last month to 27 years, ran a facility where investigators found bloody carpets and clients shooting up in their rooms.

Fraud is so endemic in Palm Beach County’s billion-dollar-a-year drug treatment industry that in 2015 health insurance provider Cigna pulled out of the Obamacare marketplace in Florida, citing overbilling for urine tests by drug treatment centers as the reason. Cigna is suing Sky Technology, a Texas-based firm that runs a string of drug-testing labs in South Florida to try and claw back some of the sky-high fees that the company has reimbursed.

Sadly our failure to regulate properly creates disastrous results and fuels fraud. We need to expose and close fraudulent facilities abusing people and robbing our healthcare dollars without treating addicted people using practices that can work.

Even when there is an honest effort to treat those addicted to drugs the success rates are far from good. Still we need to work on continuing to improve and adapt treatment practices. We can’t afford to have criminals bleed the health care treatment dollars.

Related: Drug Treatment Funding Can More Than Pay For Itself With Reduced Crime CostsA Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living HomesImproving Addiction Treatment with The University of Wisconsin – MadisonThe Causes of Drug Addiction are Complex

Vaccine That Blocks the High From Heroin is Making Progress

A vaccine developed at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) to block the high of heroin has proven effective in non-human primates. This is the first vaccine against an opioid to pass this stage of preclinical testing.

“This validates our previous rodent data and positions our vaccine in a favorable light for anticipated clinical evaluation,” said study leader Kim Janda, the Ely R. Callaway Jr. Professor of Chemistry and member of the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at TSRI.

The vaccine works by exposing the immune system to a part of the heroin molecule’s telltale structure. This teaches the immune system to produce antibodies against heroin and its psychoactive products. The antibodies neutralize heroin molecules, blocking them from reaching the brain to cause a feeling of euphoria.

Researchers believe that blocking the high of heroin will help eliminate the motivation for many recovering addicts to relapse into drug use. In recent years, public health officials around the world have labeled heroin use as an epidemic.

The Janda Laboratory at TSRI has been working on their heroin vaccine for over eight years; the researchers had previously tested vaccine candidates under laboratory conditions and in rodents, where the strategy proved effective for neutralizing heroin.

For the new study in rhesus monkeys, the researchers redesigned their vaccine candidate to more closely resemble heroin, with the goal of better stimulating the immune system to attack this opioid.

The researchers found that the four primates that were given three doses of this vaccine showed an effective immune response and could neutralize varying doses of heroin. This effect was most acute in the first month after vaccination but lasted for over eight months. The researchers also found no negative side effects from the vaccine.

“We believe this vaccine candidate will prove safe for human trials,” Janda said. He pointed out that the components of the vaccine have either already been approved by the FDA or have passed safety tests in previous clinical trials.

Related posts: USA Health Care Crisis, Opioid AbuseSad Story Illustrates the Opioid Overdose Epidemic in the USAVermont to Treat Heroin Abuse as Health Issue Instead of Fighting “War” Against AddictsThe Death of Philip Seymour Hoffman Highlights the Increased Use of Heroin

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Almost everything we think we know about addiction is wrong

Almost everything we think we know about addiction is wrong.

Addiction is just one symptom of the crisis of disconnection that is happening all around us.

The opposite of addiction is not sobriety. The opposite of addiction is connection.

In the video they talk about one of the things we posted about earlier (in The Causes of Drug Addiction are Complex): the conditions of addiction expedients that form the basis of our understanding are questionable.

The claim made in the video is that psychology is much more the cause of addiction than chemistry. There certainly is plenty of evidence suggesting psychology is very important.

The video makes the claim it is largely about a “crisis of disconnection.” That if we don’t make strong interpersonal connections we will seek solace in the form of something that distracts us (drugs or something else).

These ideas are explored further in Johann Hari’s book about drugs and addiction: Chasing the Scream.

Related: Drug Addictions Often Disappear Over Time, even without treatmentMethods to Treat AddictionFunding Drug Addiction Treatment Would Cost 1/7 the Cost of the Current Criminal System Focused PolicyCombination Strategy to Treat Alcohol Dependence

Heroin Use Spikes Among Those Who Abuse Prescription Painkillers

Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health looked at the frequency of nonmedical prescription opioid use and the risk of heroin-related behaviors and found that past-year heroin use rose among individuals taking opioids like oxycontin, and these increases varied by race and ethnicity. The most significant rise in heroin use was among Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, where the rate of heroin use for the latter group increased by 75% in 2008-2011 compared to earlier years.

Findings are published in a sad closed-science way even though funding was provided by National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health (grants K01DA030449, R03DA037770, and R01DA037866) the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Human Development (grant HD020667) and Columbia University. I suggest you contact those organizations or Columbia if you want to see what the findings are. They need to learn blocking access to scientific research is wrong and they shouldn’t fund such activity.

Nonmedical prescription opioid use is defined as using a substance that is not prescribed or taking a drug only for the experience or the feeling it caused.

Using data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a large nationally representative household sample of 67,500 people, and self-reported heroin use within the last 12 months, the researchers examined the change in patterns of past-year non-prescription drug and heroin use between 2002-2005 and 2008-2011 across racial and ethnic groups. The study also looked at the association between past year frequency of both, heroin-related risk behaviors, and exposure to heroin availability.

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Vermont to Treat Heroin Abuse as Health Issue Instead of Fighting “War” with Addicts

Vermont Quits War on Drugs to Treat Heroin Abuse as Health Issue

[Governor] Shumlin urged the legislature to approve a new set of drug policies that go beyond the never-ending cat-and-mouse between cops and dealers. Along with a crackdown on traffickers, he proposed rigorous addiction prevention programs in schools and doctors’ offices, as well as more rehabilitation options for addicts. “We must address it as a public health crisis,” Shumlin said, “providing treatment and support rather than simply doling out punishment, claiming victory, and moving on to our next conviction.”

Representative Thomas Burditt… “As everybody knows, the war on drugs is lost, pretty much. It’s time to go down a new road.”

This is one small effort, among many, to find solutions instead of continuing the failed policies used for decades. Sadly those failed policies still dominate the efforts given by governments throughout the USA. The costs to the economy and personal lives of the people is enormous. We need to experiment to find better methods to reduce he harm done to society due to drug addiction.

Related: The Death of Philip Seymour Hoffman Highlights the Increased Use of HeroinPrescription Painkillers Kill More People Every Year in USA than Heroin and Cocaine CombinedDrug Treatment Funding Can More Than Pay For Itself With Reduced Crime Costs

The Death of Philip Seymour Hoffman Highlights the Increased Use of Heroin

We lost a great actor with the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman. Once again the danger of drug use has resulted in the loss of life. He sought treatment for his addiction but failed to avoid an untimely death.

photo of Philip Seymour Hoffman by Jean Jacques Georges

Philip Seymour Hoffman at the Paris premiere of The Ides of March in 2011 by photo by Jean Jacques Georges

Hoffman death puts focus on heroin’s comeback

Hoffman, 46, was found on the bathroom floor of his New York City apartment with a syringe in his left arm and glassine bags usually associated with heroin. Police say they are investigating substances found in the apartment to determine which drugs were present, but Hoffman has been open about his drug use, which included prescription pills and heroin, and his decades-long struggle to stay sober.

As authorities crack down on clinics that prescribe pain pills by the thousands and pharmaceutical companies change their formulas so the pills are more difficult to abuse, opiate addicts are turning to cheaper and more-plentiful heroin.

In recent years, the number of people abusing prescription pain pills has dropped steadily as heroin use increased. The number of people 12 and older who regularly abuse OxyContin dropped from 566,000 in 2010 to 358,000 in 2012, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported in December. The number of regular heroin users soared from 239,000 in 2010 to 335,000 in 2012, the survey found.

The tragedy caused by the abuse of drugs damages millions every day. We have to do a better job of reducing the damage done to society due to the abuse of drugs. Celebrities shine a light on the problem but it is a widespread problem that has an immense impact throughout society.

Related: Russell brand’s testimony on dealing with drug addictionPrescription painkillers kill more every year in usa than heroin and cocaine combined Eminem’s ‘relapse’ explores his drug addition and rehabilitation